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Jekyll

Moving from Jekyll to Hugo - urls

I’ve been changing the static blog generator that I use and am slowly moving from Jekyll to Hugo. My main reason is the better support for tags and categories that Hugo supports, but I’m not finding the templating as intuitive in Hugo as in Jekyll, so it’s not a slam-dunk. There are a couple of small differences between the two systems that are making me reconfigure my blogging workflow a bit. ... (more)

Something broke in a Jekyll upgrade (a.k.a, sometimes I hate software)

This is a short story about software, some of the things I hate about it, my lack of knowledge of ruby, and a desire to own my own words. For various reasons I’m working on a brand new machine, I decided that I want to start posting to my own blog again (as well as cross posting to Medium, because fuck it, why not). That involved dusting down my Jekyll site and seeing if I could get it to work again. ... (more)

The 70/90 Rule

I was having a conversation last week with a good friend who works in the financial services sector. We were discussing technical debt, and the tendency of certain teams to want to do everything themselves. He described some colleagues in a team that is tasked with managing a large data pipeline for calculation of risks in a particular market. This is central to the bottom line of the company. Oh, they also used to run their own mailing list server! ... (more)

Volvox

“Volvox”:img:img:http://www.mulvany.net/photo/blogPics/volvox The very first thing to die on it’s own, without the intervention of an outside agent, was an organism called Volvox. The first life that we know of whose cells perish from old age, rather than misfortune. Before humble Volvox all other living things would go on forever, the immortal bacteria, the barely describable virus. Volvox introduced death by natural causes to the world, and all living things that came after that were as complex, or more so, followed suit, and found programmed within them some pace maker, set to expire after they had done their duty on the earth. ... (more)